Photo
Photo
youngblackandvegan:


Nas, teaching the youth

start em young

youngblackandvegan:

Nas, teaching the youth

start em young

(Source: real-hiphophead)

Text

theroguefeminist:

you know there’s something wrong with our society when they put a rape victim on a cover and have the words SEXUAL REVOLUTION in giant letters over her image and “movement against sexual assault” in tiny letters in the corner

(via feminishblog)

Photoset

sapphrikah:

lavenderlabia:

femmefrustration:

derseking:

femmefrustration:

mgodp:

femmefrustration:

word-riot:

This is the most ridiculous thing I’ve come across in a long time.

I understand the daily hardships that so many people have in a world ruled by white males.

I understand that sometimes this can make it feel as if all white males are the enemy (especially for those who fight for equality).

But posts like this need to stop.

You are not advancing anybodies rights.

You are not promoting anybody’s equality.

This is not activism.

This is hate-mongering.

image

image

image

Thanks for the contribution :)

I’ve lost track, am I even allowed an opinion these days? Whatever. How about this radical idea: Let’s treat each other equally, and then we’ll all be equal? All this mindless mud-slinging achieves nothing and only serves to demonstrate how true objectives of those involved (notably NOT equality).

image

image

image

You guys are good at this! :)

This isn’t okay and you need to fuckin stop.

image

This is so beautiful it brings a tear to my eye. 

(via elionking)

Text

God, I’m such a grown up today. 

Photoset

schoolteacherjammette:

notfuckingcishet:

Emma Sulkowicz. 

(x)

Yes

(via fyeahcracker)

Photoset

behind-the-book:

High School Reading List

Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Drown by Junot Diaz

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi

Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis

A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri

The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle

Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi

For descriptions, click the read more!

(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle Grade lists)

Read More

(via wocinsolidarity)

Photoset

mediamattersforamerica:

"How can you be so poor and have all this stuff?" -Bill O’Reilly

Each of these screenshots is from a different Fox show attacking poor Americans for having amenities, trying to make the point (pretty much) that “when I was a kid, poor people had a lot less than this.”

Of course, this is all based on one thoroughly-debunked Heritage Foundation report that conservative media have been parroting for years.

Breaking news for Fox: We’re not in the 1950’s anymore. As technology advances, each year older technology gets less and less expensive, and therefore more working class Americans are able to access it. 

Matt Yglesias elaborates

A serious person would follow this up with a discussion of relative prices. Over the past 50 years, televisions have gotten a lot cheaper and college has gotten a lot more expensive. Consequently, even a low income person can reliably obtain a level of television-based entertainment that would blow the mind of a millionaire from 1961. At the same time, if you’re looking to live in a safe neighborhood with good public schools in a metropolitan area with decent job opportunities you’re going to find that this is quite expensive. Health care has become incredibly expensive. The federal poverty line for a family of three is $18,530 a year. I wonder how many Heritage Foundation policy analysts are deciding they want to cut back and work part time because it’d be super easy to raise two kids in DC on less than $20k in salary? Perhaps just an outfit full of workaholics.

While Fox is so busy pointing out how many people have access to microwaves and refrigerators, they conveniently forget to mention how many people have poor access to quality education, health care, and affordable housing. Because really, what good is an A/C if you can’t even afford to keep living in your house? 

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

Photo
elionking:

mapsontheweb:

Every country that has declared independence from the U.K./Great Britain

Never dawned on me that USA is one of only two countries to get its independence before the 20th century. None of the rest of these are even a century old in terms of independence

elionking:

mapsontheweb:

Every country that has declared independence from the U.K./Great Britain

Never dawned on me that USA is one of only two countries to get its independence before the 20th century. None of the rest of these are even a century old in terms of independence

(Source: globalpost.com)

Quote
"I wasn’t against communism, but i can’t say i was for it either. At first, i viewed it suspiciously, as some kind of white man’s concoction, until i read works by African revolutionaries and studied the African liberation movements. Revolutionaries in Africa understood that the question of African liberation was not just a question of race, that even if they managed to get rid of the white colonialists, if they didn’t rid themselves of the capitalistic economic structure, the white colonialists would simply be replaced by Black neocolonialists. There was not a single liberation movement in Africa that was not fighting for socialism. In fact, there was not a single liberation movement in the whole world that was fighting for capitalism. The whole thing boiled down to a simple equation: anything that has any kind of value is made, mined, grown, produced, and processed by working people. So why shouldn’t working people collectively own that wealth? Why shouldn’t working people own and control their own resources? Capitalism meant that rich businessmen owned the wealth, while socialism meant that the people who made the wealth owned it."

— Assata Shakur, Assata: An Autobiography (via rs620)

(via wocinsolidarity)